DIY, craft, materials, and such / DIY around the house

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Painting and related

Drilling

Screwing

Sawing

Jigsaws

This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

...referring to the modern powertool, not the hand jigsaw. (Translations: decoupeerzaag, Stichsäge, etc.)


There seem to be two saw locking types:

Bayonet style fitting
  • Bayonet
    • not all jigsaws actually use the bayonet for locking
    • Used by AEG, Bosch, some/newer Black & Decker, DeWalt, Hitachi, Mac Allister, Makita, McKeller, Metabo, some Power Base,
'Universal hole' fitting (without hole)
  • 'Universal hole fitting' or just 'universal'
    • may or may not have a hole
    • Not all jigsaws use the hole for fastening
    • usually end in a half-hole sort of arc thing
    • Used by some/older Black & Decker, some Power Base, Skil, some/older Kress



See also:



Electrical cabling

See Electronics_project_notes/Power_notes#Power_and_cables



Practical notes around the house

Central heating

Air in the system hampers the flow (...depending a little on design, exactly where the air is caught, and how much air there is).

Filling

This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)


Topping off a system that is showing lowish pressure is not very hard - there's usually a refill tap, a refill hose next to it, and hopefully some place where that hose can be attached to your house water supply without too many weird adapters.

Chances are that you'll add some air to the system, or not get all of it out.

Much of this can come from your filling hose, so try to fill that hose with water from your tap before you connect that hose to the refill point and actually start refilling. That may be hard to do, so don't sweat it.

It can be useful to use the airing taps on the places most likely to collect air, immediately and a few days later.


Expansion tank

This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

Catches any large-ish pressure differences variation in the system, e.g. that from the slightly expanding water, closed radiators making for a smaller system (with the same-capacity pump), fluid hammer, and such. It has a membrane that water can push against, which can catch a given difference in volume and pressure.

It can be placed anywhere in the system, but preferably often goes near the end of the system - that is, before the furnace, on the suck end of the pump. This means it'll have to deal with less pressure variation, and is also less likely to be isolated from the system if you close a cutoff tap (it also often means you may have to drain half the system for maintenance/replacement, but so be it)


If the tank is full (you can tell by tapping the thing, and preferably having heard both empty (more reverb) and full (more thud-like) before), it's either broken or you've filled your system beyond acceptable pressure.

Note that when you have a pressure gauge on it, that the placement of the expansion tank affects what it should read.