Difference between revisions of "A priori, a posteriori"

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Basically,
 
Basically,
 
''A priori'' roughly means something "(from) that which goes before".  
 
''A priori'' roughly means something "(from) that which goes before".  
Often used in a "prior to experience/measurement".
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: Often used in a "prior to experience/measurement".
  
 
''A posteriori'' "(from) that which comes after".
 
''A posteriori'' "(from) that which comes after".
Often meaning after experience, or using said experience.
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: Often meaning after experience, or using said experience
  
  
  
The terms can be confusing as they entangle some related ideas, and their everyday use can differ from their philosophical uses (timing and epistemology).
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In evidence-based science this is relatively straightforward.
  
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It gets a little more interesting around their philosophical uses (timing and [[epistemology]]).
  
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And sometimes these two are mixed.
  
: On the more philosophical, epistemological side:
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: '''On the more philosophical, [[epistemology|epistemological]] side:'''
  
 
'''A priori''' generally means deduction from facts, or from first principles, from definitions, from agreements, towards consequences/effects.
 
'''A priori''' generally means deduction from facts, or from first principles, from definitions, from agreements, towards consequences/effects.
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: In more pragmatic settings
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: '''In more pragmatic settings'''
  
 
A priori tends to translate as 'pre-existing' or, as in prior.
 
A priori tends to translate as 'pre-existing' or, as in prior.

Revision as of 17:33, 11 September 2019

This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)