Common plugs and connectors

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(One of the ideas for this page is visual matching for things you are likely to find, another point is to show comparable connectors)


For connectors used in electronics, see also Electronics notes/Mounts, chip carriers, packages, connectors#Connectors


Contents

Multi-purpose, often home electronics, audio

TRS (Tip, Ring, Sleeve) and variations

3.5mm (1/8") TRS plug (bottom left),
2.5mm TRS plug (back),
6.3mm TRS plug (right)
3.5mm TRS plug with microphone symbol and PC99's microphone color

Usually carries audio, occasionally basic signalling. The 3.5mm variation is also referred to as audio jack, mini-jack, jack plug, stereo plug, phone plug, and others.

Most commonly seen in the 3.5mm (1/8") variant. You also see the 2.5mm (3/32″) variation, often for smaller devices, and the 6.3mm (1/4") connectors where sturdier connectors are useful.


The 3.5mm plugs are now occasionally seen color-coded to match with sound cards that color their sockets according to colors introduced in PC99, e.g. pink for microphone, green for line level output.


Variations include TS (Tip and Sleeve, e.g. for mono sound) and TRRS (Tip, Ring, Ring, Sleeve, e.g. in headphones with controllers in the wire).


See also:


RCA

RCA socket and plug
Bunch of RCA sockets (for two types of audio output and two types of video output)

Used for audio, video (often composite, now also component), some simple data (like non-optical digital audio)

Named for its introduction by the Radio Corporation of America. Other names include cinch connector, phono connector.


See also:


DIN, mini-DIN

Left: One of various DIN plugs (5-pin 180-degrees).
Right: 4-plug mini-DIN, here used in an S-Video adapter cable

DIN usually refers to the plug/socket system with a round metal friction locking shield, 13.2mm in diameter. (DIN technically refers to a whole standardizing organization and not to anything specific. The various DIN plugs are defined in more standards than are easily mentioned, so the group is often referred to as just 'DIN plugs'.) It seems the original DIN standards are out of print, and you now want to read IEC 60130-9.

The plugs are still used for some things, but are not common in newer devices. The most common use you probably still see is MIDI, and some leftovers from older applications, including analog audio, the AT keyboard connector, some basic data signalling, often where a relatively sturdy connector is/was useful.


The PS/2 mouse and keyboard interfaces use 6-pin mini-DIN connectors (these things are adaptors from USB, and follow PC99 colors[1])

Mini-DIN is a smaller variation of DIN, with a 9.5mm round metal shield. Additionally uses plastic slots that makes plugging in plugs into wrong/different slots harder to do (it is easier to accidentally interchange some of the larger DIN plugs).

Apple Desktop Bus[2] used 4-pin mini-DIN

Perhaps most associated with S-video, which uses the 4-pin mini-DIN plug and socket. Other uses include audio, video, some fairly one-off video card adapters (see also Video), some communication

Also applied in a number of proprietary uses, though note and there are various plugs that look like min-DIN (in that, like DIN, they have a 9.5mm housing) but are not standardized by DIN.


See also:




Nonstandard mini-DIN-like sockets and plugs

Not a standard 7-pin mini-DIN plug. This one is used on a video card

There are a number of non-standard connectors that share the same 9.5mm housing as mini-DIN, but are not standard plugs.

Some plugs or sockets are specifically designed to be (in)compatible with specific standard plugs/sockets, for example to allow the proprietary and a standard plug into a socket, or to disallow specific others.


Modular connector (and Registered Jack); ?P?C

8P8C plug, 6P6C plug, 6P4C plug, 4P4C plug, 6P6C socket
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

(Note: 'Registered Jack' refers to a standard involving modular jacks but specifically when using it for wiring a telephone network)


Variations are named by how many positions there are in the plug (which also implies the plug's width), and how many conductors are actually present in this particular plug (filled out from the center positions).

For example, 6P2C has 6 positions and two conductors, 8P8C has 8 positions and has conductors in all positions.

The 2, 4, 6, 8 positions/lead connectors are mostly standard, 10P10C also exists.

Some commonly seen variations/applications include:

  • Ethernet cables (100BASE-TX) use 8P8C connectors. These plugs are also seen in telephone wiring, mostly in companies (see note below)
  • Telephone plug is often a 6P2C or 6P4C plug plugging into a 6P socket (6P6C, 6P4C and 6P2C are all seen in different contexts)
  • It is not unusual to see 4P4C to connect phone handset to the phone body


One of the potentially useful things about these plugs is that smaller plugs fit in larger sockets, e.g. 6P plugs fit in 8P sockets. Since the clip centers the plug, and some standards consider similar standards, plugging thing into (larger) sockets occasionally makes sense. For example, you could wire 8P8C sockets in a building to carry both phone and 100Mbit networking (since 100BASE-TX only needs two pairs, and does not use the two center pins that 6P2C type phone connections use)


The plugs are correlated with applications/wirings. Some of the more common ones (For larger lists, see e.g. [Wikipedia: Registered_jack#List_of_official_types] ):

  • 4P4C ~ RJ9 (mostly used to connect handsets to phones - two pairs, one for the microphone and one for the speaker)
  • 6P2C ~ RJ11 (one-pair, one telephone line)
  • 6P4C ~ RJ14 (two-pair, two telephone lines)
  • 6P6C ~ RJ25 (three-pair, three telephone lines)
  • 8P8C ~ RJ45 (sort of; see below), and RJ49 (ISDN)(verify)

The standard called RJ45 is obsolete (and historically associated with 8P2C). People who say RJ45 are usually thinking of 8P8C plugs wired according to TIA/EIA-568-B (for Fast Ethernet) (not 8P2C wired according to RJ45).


Note that not all RJ standards use this plug type; see e.g. RJ21



See also:

TOSLINK, mini-TOSLINK

RC-5720, usually called TOSLINK

While TOSLINK specifies a few plugs, it is mostly associated with the EIAJ/JEITA RC-5720 plug. This plug now always carries S/PDIF (other things that are seen carrying S/PDIF include RCA and BNC).


Mini-TOSLINK looks like a stereo jack (3.5mm TRS style) but carries fiber to its tip. There are adapters from the larger square TOSLINK to mini-TOSLINK.

This allows laptops (and other size-restrained devices) to have both a stereo jack and digital audio connector in the same socket - seen e.g. on Apple computers, portable MiniDisc players.


See also:

Banana plugs

Banana plug (4mm) on the black plug on the left.
The thinner (2mm) not-so-banana plug on the right

The 4mm version often carries lowish-current power or occasionally audio (amp/speaker connections), and is seen for for measuring devices, such as multimeters (and e.g. banana-to-BNC for oscillosocopes).

The banana plug is named for the curve that comes from the lengthwise springs that friction-lock the plug. Actually, shapes vary, and not all 4mm plugs have a friction-lock design, but most do.


There is a 2mm plug sometimes seen in similar situations, but it was never used as widely - and it is not often referred to as a (variation of) banana plug, because the lengthwise springs are not there.


See also:


Video cables/plugs

This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)


Composite video

Female and male RCA. Yellow is associated with video use (much like red and black are with stereo sound)

Composite video (not to be confused with component video) usually plugs around in a one-yellow-RCA-plug way, and sometimes using a BNC plug.

Carries Y, U, and V with sync pulses, and is also easy to broadcast - it is almost entirely the same as analog TV's format. Video recorders and some early computers modulate such a signal onto a local video channel, on their antenna output wire.

The main upsides to composite is probably that it is easy to transfer video between devices with a simple, common plug.


The main downside is that it susceptible to various visual artifacts, including noise/interference, dot crawl, also depending on the quality of the encoding/decoding hardware.

Quality you get from composite video varies noticeably between different (types/qualities/designs of) devices, and you want to use only shortish cables.

Composite video can also be called CVBS, an acronym with various possible readings, depending on who you ask: "Color, Video, Blank and Sync", "Composite Video Baseband Signal", "Composite Video Burst Signal", or "Composite Video with Burst and Sync".

Component video (YPbPr)

Red, Green, Blue RCA (...which suggests component video)

Component video (not to be confused with composite video) usually refers to carrying a YPbPr signal, usually using three RCA connectors.


More broadly, it can refer to any system that sends video in multiple separated channels.

Note that while the plugs used for YPbPr components are red, green, and blue, this is not RGB video (which also exists, in multiple forms, and they could all be called component video.


See also Color#YCbCr_and_YPbPr



S-Video

S-video plug, the wire carrying two pairs

S-Video (also Super Video or Separated Video, and also sometimes called Y/C) carries luma (Y) and chroma (C) signals on separate wire pairs, using standard 4-pin mini-DIN plugs.


It is comparable to composite video in that it carries the same information, but avoids the need for modulation and demodulation of the Y and C channels, by simply keeping them separate.

Since S-Video avoids the mix-and-separation step present in Composite, it is somewhat less susceptible to interference and cheap (de)modulation hardware. In ideal conditions, composite is the same quality, though.


S-Video-to-Composite-video converter cables can just join the wires (although this may mean the colors are less saturated - something about the voltage amplitudes of these two signals?(verify)). Note that you can not use that same converter to go from composite to S-Video, as that would put a mixed Y+C channel on both the Y and C pairs. The S-video decoder hardware will usually partially understand this, and it usually results in a black and white image(verify).


S-Video-like

Not a standard 7-pin mini-DIN plug. This one is one end of a computer video card adapter cable

You may find video-related cables that resemble the 4-pin mini-DIN S-Video plug. This includes:

  • Video cards may come with a 7-pin plug. This is rarely a standard mini-DIN plug, and often has its plastic slot in the same place as on the 4-pin DIN plug, but wider, so that the video card socket will accept a standard S-Video plug, and also the plug on the cable supplied with the card which uses the extra pins to carry, usually, another type of video (often composite video, sometimes composite video).
  • and 9-pin variation called VIVO, also seen on video cards, that allows S-Video in, S-Video out, component out, and composite out.
  • a different 7-pin connector (standard mini-DIN) used on some professional (VCR) kits



SCART

General purpose SCART interconnector cable's plug
Two specific-purpose SCART plugs, with only the pins they need for audio and composite video

SCART (also Euro AV, EIA Multiport) combines formats used by various common plugs, making it somewhat easier to connect various common home devices. SCART is most commonly found on VCRs and TVs, and also on modern DVD players and such.

SCART can carry:

  • Mono/Stereo Audio, both ways
  • Composite video, both ways
  • S-Video may be supported both ways, but isn't always implemented
  • RGB (on newer hardware, by re-purposing some wires)


You can find plugs that convert to composite, audio, and S-Video, and sometimes versions with a switch that selects whether you want to use the converter plug to do input or output.

RGB is higher quality, but

  • has to be supported by both sides
  • can also not be used at the same time as S-Video output
  • is only meant for player-to-display travel.

Supported primarily by some more modern TV sets (receiving role) and recent media players (sending role) although supporting players only use RGB when you explicitly configure them for it, for compatibility reasons.


See also:


Digital video cables (high speed and/or uncompressed)

This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

Such as:

DVI

DVI pinout chart (click for details)

On digital and/or analog

DVI can carry both analog and digital video, but specific wires and interfaces can choose to do just one.


DVI connector variants (male)

In the plugs, there is a plate on one side - if there are pins around that (red in the pinout image on the right), the cable can carry analog video.

If the block of pins close to it is not a full 3x3 block, the cable can carry only analog and is called DVI-A.


If there are at least two blocks of 3x3 pins, the cable can carry digital video. If it can carry only digital and not analog it is called DVI-D. If it can carry analog as well (also has the pins around the plate) it is called DVI-I.

If it is one solid block of pins (that is, includes the blue pins in the image on the right), it can do dual-link (which few devices need, so this is relatively rare).


There are some other connectors that look like DVI, such as VESA P&D / M1-DA (an extension from VESA) and DMS-59 (a grid of pins, which can carry DVI, but needs a converter to do so), LFH (similar).


See also:


MiniVGA, MiniDVI, MicroDVI, Mini DisplayPort

Mini-VGA (socket circled, plug on top)
Mini-DVI plug (on an adapter cable for a Macbook)
Mini DisplayPort (again, for a Macbook)

These are seen mainly in Apple hardware (mostly MacBooks).

Mini-VGA seems to have been replaced by Mini-DVI, Mini DisplayPort on modern MacBooks.

Not standardized, with the exception of Mini DisplayPort, which was adopted by VESA.


See also:


HDMI

HDMI plug (Type A, 19 pins)
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) [3]

Digital transfer. Can carry HD video, and audio. Has hardware-level copy protection (HDCP).

Can carry DVI-D fairly directly (...but this will probably only work if the DVI device supports HDCP).

See also:


DisplayPort

DisplayPort plug

DisplayPort [4]


GVIF

Gigabit Video Interface (GVIF), carried by a single twisted pair of wires

UDI

UDI (Unified Display Interface) [5] [6]

Apparently deprecated in favour of DisplayPort(verify)


D-Terminal

D-terminal plug

D-Terminal (not to be confused with D-Subminiature), mostly used in Japan, and somewhat more widely in digital satellite tuners.

The wires carry component video, and signal lines that signal resolution, ratio, and interlace/progressive (via logic-level voltages).

Breakout cables to component video over RCA and BNC exist.

Can carry HD.

See also:


Computer

USB

Most commonly seen:
USB mini-B plug,   USB B plug,   USB A socket,   USB A plug
Various plugs in wiring diagrams (plus the micro versions, and the mini-A not in the previous picture)
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

From most to least common (well, a guess at that):

  • USB A: The plug/socket seen on the computer side and USB hubs (and sometimes elsewhere, e.g. on printers for direct camera connection)
  • USB B: Used on the device size for bulkier devices, such as scanners and printers, where there are no space limitations and sturdiness is handy
  • USB mini-B: Used by various smaller devices, such as cameras, MP3 players, some phones
  • There is a non-standard(verify) 8-pin mini-sized plug, with 5 USB pins, and the other 3 pins regularly missing (usable for audio+video on some cameras). This plug is sometimes confusingly called B(-type).
  • USB mini-A: not seen much, perhaps because it is potentially confusable with mini-B -- although it also seems that there are two different plug shapes that you'll find that plug into the socket(verify)
  • USB mini-AB socket (socket-only) that can accept both mini-A and mini-B plugs. Relatively rare.
  • USB micro-B plugs and sockets, meant for use in thinner devices (fairly recent, seen on a number of smart-phones)
  • USB micro-A plugs and sockets, meant for use in thinner devices (Fairly recent, and not yet seen much)
  • USB micro-AB socket (only a socket) that can accept both Micro-A and micro-B is defined by USB On The Go (OTG) (2001 standard, and not yet seen much)


The mini connectors are approximately 3mm by 7mm, the micro versions are mostly thinner, which is one reason they are used on some particularly slim devices.


See also:



8P8C / Ethernet cable

Ethernet cable (8P8C plug, TIA/EIA-568-B wiring)

For the series of connectors, see #Modular_connector_.28and_Registered_Jack.29.3B_.3FP.3FC

For the use of 8P8C in ethernet, see Network wiring notes - 8P8C / RJ45


Molex power and Berg power connectors

A molex plug (top) and socket (bottom)
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

The Molex power plug is seen mostly in computer power supplies, the socket is mostly seen on hard drives, CD/DVD drives and the likes. It is now being largely replaced by SATA power connectors.

Molex actually makes a lot of types of plugs. This one is the most noticable in the context of compuers (Molex KK is also fairly common).


A Berg / 4-pin mini-Molex plug

Just as the Molex plug is named after its designer, there is also a Berg plug named after its designer (though this is also called 4-pin mini-Molex). The Berg plug is the smaller plug used on 3.5 inch floppy drives. The plugs are becoming about as rare as the floppy drives themselves (and Berg was always a lesser known name than Molex).


See also:


SATA

Basic SATA data plug (7-pin), no clip
SATA Power connector (15-pin)
Left: One end of a SATA cable (with clip)
Right: eSATA plug
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

Many of us mostly care about SATA data (and the power) cables SATA wants, which is the 7-pin data cable and the 15-pin power cable (there are other power cable variants).

To avoid breaking the plastic of the motherboard data socket, a variation was introduced with more holder plastic around it, and a plug with a clip that can be used in them (see images on the right).


For external use there is eSATA, which is pin-compatible, but the connector and socket are a little different, mostly for plugging safety (and so that you can't plug SATa cables meant for internal use onto external ports).


Basic SATA data sockets on a motherboard
SATA data sockets on a motherboard. This variation is a little sturdier and accepts the clip



On power:

SATA's basic power connector has that many pins for scalability reasons - it has three voltages (3.3V, 5V, 12V) with three pins each, to be able to meet requirements of power hungry drives (while not exceepding 1.5A per wire) and a signalling cable.

There are slimline and micro versions of the power connector, which use simpler wiring.

Notes:

  • if the sata connector comes from a molex adapter, you cannot hotswap the power (verify)
  • the 3.3V line is currently often unused (as molex adapter cables cannot provide it)


See also:



Firewire (IEEE 1394)

The 6-lead plug
The larger 6-lead connector and smaller 4-lead connector
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

IEEE 1394 is also known as FireWire (Apple), i.LINK (Sony), and Lynx (Texas Instruments).

It was meant as a successor to parallel SCSI, and is also commonly used for some digital cameras, and for high-end audio and video devices. Was a potential competitor to USB in many areas, but while USB is somewhat slower (depending on which variant of FireWire and USB), USB is more popular for many things.


Connectors include:

  • 4-lead (smaller, e.g. used on more portable devices like cameras. Data-compatible with the 6-lead connector, but doesn't provide power). Initially developed by Sony, later more widely adopted(verify)
    • two twisted pairs of data
  • 6-lead ('alpha')
    • two twisted pairs of data, power
  • 9-lead ('beta')
    • two twisted pairs of data, power, shield (verify)
  • 8P8C connector (used in 1394c)


Standards:

  • IEEE 1394, specifically IEEE 1394-1995
  • IEEE 1394a, specifically IEEE 1394a-2000, also known as FireWire 400
    • Uses the 4-lead and 6-lead ('alpha') connectors
  • IEEE 1394b, specifically IEEE 1394b-2002, also known as FireWire 800 (Apple's name)
    • adds the 9-lead ('beta') connector
  • IEEE 1394c, specifically IEEE 1394c-2006, also known as FireWire S800T
    • adds the 8P8C connector


See also:


PS/2

PS/2 plugs, on USB-mouse-to-PS/2 adapter and USB-keyboard-to-PS/2 adapters, respectively
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

Uses the 6-pin mini-DIN connector. For keyboards, this replaced the larger DIN plug used on AT style computers before PS/2. For mice, this became an alternative to serial port mice, though USB is now also quite common for keyboards and mice.


D-sub (D-subminiature)

The sizes (widths) of various D-sub plugs
DE-15, also named HD-15 (and also, somewhat incorrectly, DB15 and HDDB15), used for VGA monitor connections
Back of a computer with DB-25F (parallel port), DE-15F (VGA connector), DE-9M (serial port).
The DA-15M held next to it is a MIDI cable
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

Most D-subminiature plugs have two rows of pins (some three), and a shell for seating and earthing.

Some common examples:

  • DE9: often a serial port (RS232) interface
  • DB25: Parallel ports (also once for serial ports), sometimes (older) SCSI
  • DE15: VGA monitor connectors. (Uses three rows of pins. Also technically called HD-15, where HD stands for the High Density of the pins compared to other D-Sub plugs)
  • DA15: Often seen on sound cards, originally for joysticks, now mostly for MIDI cables


The codes mention their size, amount of pins, and optionally a reference to a specific's plug male or female nature. (For example, the parallel port on the back of a computer is DB25F, the serial port DE9M).

The letter size code code refers to how many pins the variation could house, which is usually but not always how many it does house. Consider for example the DB13W3 (and also a few incorrect references, or unusual variations).

Some have used specific letter codes thinking that they referred to the D-sub plugs in general, and started patterns of misleading use for those that do know what they mean.



Ribbon-cable-and-IDC

34-pin floppy cable plug on the left, a 40-pin parallel ATA plug on the right (the latter recognizable by the one filled hole, and the plastic alignment notch is also fairly common)

In computer circles mostly known as ribbon cable, not naming the plug. (The plug is called an insulation-displacement connector, IDC (also DIN 41 651)).


The IDC hole spacing ('pitch') is often 2.54mm (0.1 inch), though there are other variations. For example, the notebook parallel ATA connectors have 2.0mm pitch.


Common variations in computers:

  • 40 pin 3.5" hard drive connectors (parallel ATA)
  • 44-pin 2.5" notebook hard drive connectors (parallel ATA) (2mm pitch)
  • 34-pin floppy connectors (controller, 3.5" drive end)
  • Some motherboard-connected back ports not directly soldered to the motherboard, e.g. an extra serial port, midi/gameport, and more recently USB (varying standards), audio connectors (varying standards).


See also:

Centronics connectors (Micro ribbon)

Female 36-pin Centronics connector, seen e.g. on printers
Male 36-pin Centronics connector, seen e.g. on printer cables
Female 50-pin Centronics connector, here used to connect SCSI-1
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

Perhaps best known for use in

  • 36-pin: IEEE 1284 printer cables, specifically a male DB25 plug to male 36-pin Centronics plug (this use is mostly outdated)
  • 50-pin: SCSI-1 (also mostly outdated)


Confusable with:

  • mini-Centronics
  • Japan's D-Terminal connector


See also:



mini-Centronics

This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)


Fan connector

3-pin fan plug in 4-pin (intel-style) connector
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

PC fans are often connected with a three-pin connector (technically a polarized variant from the Molex KK family) which supplies 12V, ground, and a sensor wire that the computer can use to count revolutions.

Note:

  • There are a number of proprietary, not-so-standard variations, such as Dell's,
  • There is a newer variation, introduced by Intel, with a fourth pin (to allow the computer to control the speed more intelligently than PWMming the voltage?(verify))


You can also get a lower speed by under-volting, using a speed controller, or even just splicing it between +12V and +5V (probably on a molex plug so you don't have to cut a PSU{ wire), though note that not all fans will spin up at that 7V.

You also see adapters from the larger molex power plug to use the 12V line from the power supply directly, usually with the sensor wire unconnected.


See also

RF/coax connectors

Plugs desiged (mostly in terms of shielding and impedance) to carry radio frequencies, associated with carrying video, data, and more.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RF_connector

Belling-Lee (IEC 169-2)

Both ends of a Belling-Lee extender cable
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

Used for TV (and radio) connectors in some european countries.


Note that on houses with more serious installations, it's not unusual to see these only in the eventual wall-plug and the cable that goes to the TV, and e.g. F collectors on signal boosters and such. This because the Belling-Lee plugs are not ideal for VHF and UHF frequencies (but fine for MW and Shortwave).

See also:


F Connector (IEC 169-24)

F Connector
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

Often used for cable television / cable modems, satellite television, and (American) TV aerial connections. A little better for VHF and UHF than Belling-Lee is.



See also:


BNC

BNC connector on an old network card (note: the plastic thread is meant for a fastening ring and not part of BNC(verify))
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

BNC, Bayonet Neill-Concelman (also sometimes Baby Neill-Concelman connector, Baby N connector, british naval connector, bayonet nut connector) was once common for networking. Still used for some antennae, video and audio ends.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BNC_connector


TNC

TNC connector
R-TNC (Reverse TNC) connector for the antennae on a wireless router

TNC, Threaded Neill-Concelman, is a variation on BNC with a screw thread system (BNC uses bayonet).


Reverse TNC is reverse in that the inward/outward threading is switched between male and female plugs. This is seen e.g. in WiFi antennas, an area where R-SMA is also regularly seen(verify).


See also:


C connector

C connector (left), beside a BNC connector (right) for an impression of size
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

The Type C Connector looks like BNC, but is bigger.

(BNC was developed as a smaller version of this [7])


See also:


SMA and reverse SMA

SMA (male)
SMA (female)
RP-SMA / RSMA (male) (on a PCI WiFi card)
RP-SMA / RSMA (female) (on an antenna for that same card)

SMA is short for for SubMiniature version A. There are also SMB and SMC connectors.


A variation on SMA called RP-SMA ('reverse polarity') is used in WiFi antenna connectors (R-TNC also sees use there).


See also:




SMB

This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

See also:



MCX, MMCX

See also:


U.FL

Some size reference
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)
Close-up; U.FL connector on the left (top right of the PCB), and plug held in the calipers on the right.


Other related plugs/names:

  • MHF
  • AMC
  • IPEX
  • IPAX

These are all small connectors for high-frequency RF signals, and mostly interchangeable. Seen in various mobile and wireless applications.


There are adapters to things like (RP-)SMA sold for certain applications, such as WiFi, mobile modules (particularly M2M[8]), and others.


See also:


Power - device side

Low/medium voltage

...e.g. adapters, battery packs, solar panels, and such.


DC connectors, EIAJ power, coaxial and more

The common 5.5mm thick DC plug with 2.5mm pin (socket and plug)
A bunch more
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

Usually means low-voltage DC (usually under 20V), though on occasion used for low-voltage AC.

Up to a few millimeters thick, often concentric barrel-style or tip-(ring-)sleeve style


Generally not so standardized, and since there are a lot of variants it's hard to recognize even the more standard ones. There are perhaps half a dozen common plugs/sockets, and probably at least a dozen or two more variants.

The most recognizable and common is the 5.5mm thick coaxial/barrel plug with a 2.5mm pin.


In the image on the right, from top to bottom:

  • 2.5mm tip-sleeve
  • 3.5mm tip-sleeve
  • 5.0mm barrel (~6.2mm tip) (verify)
  • EIAJ-01 (2.35mm barrel, 0.7mm inner diameter)
  • 3.5mm barrel (1.35mm(verify) inner diameter)
  • EIAJ-02 (4.0mm barrel, 1.7mm inner diameter)
  • 5.5mm barrel, for 1.5mm pin
  • 5.5mm barrel, for 2.5mm pin


Notes:

  • Yellow-tipped DC connectors are likely to be EIAJ variants


See also:


3-Pin and 4-Pin DC Plugs

Snap and lock 4-pin power.jpg
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Doesn't seem to have a single clear name. Everyday names seem to include:

  • 'snap and lock' used (though not all variants lock),
  • 'power mini-DIN' and 'power DIN.' - misleading as this does not mate with any mini-DIN plugs or sockets, because of the thicker pins and larger shell (10mm instead of mini-DIN's 9.5mm).

Often used to deliver two different voltages, and/or more current than basic DC plugs are comfortable with.

More specialized

Unsorted

This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)
JST connectors

JST refers to a company [9] which make many series of plugs, many of which are PCB connectors, useful for data signalling, though many are rated for (on the order of) 2A, and so also useful to transfer some power.

JST PH series
Plugged 2-pin PH-series connector
9-pin male PH-series connector


The 2-pin (2mm-pitch) connector is currently perhaps most recognized as the connector on lithium batteries.

Exists with 2mm and 1mm pitch, and 2-pin to 16-pin(verify).

Rated for 2A


JST RCY series
JST RCY series,
socket and plug

Known as the JST connector, BEC connector, P connector

Rated for 3A (and often seen with 22AWG wire(verify)). Seen in RC vehicle applications.



Seen in cars and such

Cigarette lighter plug
Cigar lighter plug.jpg
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Cigar(ette) lighter plug, vehicle receptible, whatever you want to call it. Also called a 12V plug.


Note that there are actually three variations of this, with mildly different sizes.


See also:


SAE connector (S-S connector?)
SAE connector (and a die for size reference)
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

SAE connector, apparently also called S-S connector.

Mates with an identical plug. Seen in cars, motorcycles, some batteries, some solar panels, and such.

Meant to be connected so that the exposed leads coming from the power source may safely touch the chassis.

See also:


Mostly seen in RC applications

Pricy, fancy, current-drawing remote controlled vehicles.


Tamiya connector
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Tamiya is regularly seen in RC battery packs. The plug/hole shapes mean this is a polarized connection (the square one is positive, the rounded-on-one-side one is ground).

Tamiya seems to be considered a cheapish choice that is good enough for up to a few amps.

Also exists in mini variation.



The Deans Ultra connector is a polarized plug made to carry serious current (...for its size), ~30A.

The plug design is a little smaller than, say, Tamiya, and not the most shielded choice, but it's rated for more than Tamiya.

There is also a smaller variation of the connector, micro Deams, rated for a dozen amps.



Powerpole - Anderson PowerPoles (also known as sermos) are rated for ~30A.

Apparently easier to pull apart than some other higher-amp choices, and lasting somewhat longer.

See also:



EC3 is a polarized plastic plug (resembling Tamiya) around bullet-style connectors, and apparently rated for more than powerpole/deans (60A?(verify)).

There is a less common larger variant called EC5

See also:





Bullet connectors may be rated for up to a few dozen or even one or two hundred amps.

Exists in varying designs, some of which rather resemble banana plugs.

See also




Kyosho is comparable to tamiya in rating and also looks similar to it (also resembles EC3 in details).

Also exists in a mini variation.

See also




TRX

See also



Higher voltage (mains power)

IEC connectors

This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

Refers to IEC 60320 (IEC 320 before the renumbering), the plug/socket system commonly used on devices which can use various socket-to-device wires.

C1 through C24 are defined, and the male and female versions of a type connector have different numbers. Many are polarized. For a few there are variations (e.g. C7/C8), and some are variants of other IEC plugs (e.g. C17/C18 is unearthed variant of C13/C14).


The most common are probably:

C14
(pairs with C13)
C13
(pairs with C14)
  • C13/C14, commonly associated with PC power supplies, and other devices that may need its 10 Amp rating, such as various professional audio equipment.
    • Rated at 10A



C8
(pairs with C7)
C7
(pairs with C8)
polarized C7
(pairs with polarized C8)
  • C7/C8, often seen in unpolarized form ('figure eight', 'shotgun'), is seen on various simple non-earthed devices, from radios to VCRs, some laptop computer power supplies, game consoles.
    • rated at 2.5A
    • unpolarised C7 connectors can be inserted into polarized C8 sockets, but this can sometimes be a bad idea
    • polarized C7 won't fit into unpolarized C8, although that wouldn't be a problem (verify)
    • See also C1/C2


C5
(pairs with C6)
  • C5/C6, regularly seen in laptop power supplies and other PC-related power supplies.
    • rated for 2.5A



  • C1/C2, commonly seen on shavers.
    • Rated at 0.2A


See also:



Power - wall plugs

This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

See:


Some of the more common plugs are listed below (lettering system as used by some US document on worldwide power)



Type A, Type B, household NEMA variants, JISC C 8303 Class II

(North America, Japan, some other places)

Type A plug
Type B plug

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEMA_connector

Type B wall socket
  • Non-earthed 2-wire plug is Type A / NEMA 1 / ...
  • Earthed 3-wire plug is Type B / NEMA 5 / ...
  • NEMA mentions about two dozen other variations (some polarized)


Type F / Schuko / CEE 7/4

(Europe)

Type F plug
Type F wall socket

Type F plugs/sockets, also known as Schuko (short for Schutzkontakt), and formally CEE 7/4, are round sockets/plugs with two earth clips on the side, and two guides for a more robust fit in the socket.

It is used in much of (western) Europe, commonly seen in wall sockets and power strips.


The Russian Gost 7396 is similar, but has thinner prongs, so while you can plug Gost into Schuko sockets, Schuko plugs often don't fit into Gost sockets(verify).


CEE 7/7 plugs

CEE 7/7 plug

These plugs are designed to be usable in most of Europe and be earthed, by accepting both Type F style earth (much of Europe) and Type E style earth (France, Belgium, also Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Denmark).

Seen in wires that must be earthed (so can't be Europlugs) and meant for wide sales. Often seen on things like computer power supply cables (with a C17 plug on the other end).


Other, non-earthed European plugs: Type C, CEE 7/16, CEE 7/17, Europlug

Round type C sockets (on an old power strip)

A Type C wall-socket is usually round, and is a socket that will accept most any European-style plugs (C, E, F; 7/4, 7/7, others), but is not earthed.


The round type C plug, however, will not plug into Type E or F sockets, so is now fairly rare.



Flat Type C: CEE 7/16, Europlug
Europlugs are common to certain types of devices, such as wallwart DC adapters

The thin version of Type C, CEE 7/16, regularly called a 'Europlug', is a plug that fits most European-style sockets (Type C, E, F, others).


Thin sockets are sometimes seen, mostly on power strips.



(Type C) CEE 7/17 plug


The CEE 7/17 plug is a something of a (still unearthed) adaptation of 7/16 to be compatible with Type E and F sockets, and round type C.


There is a (fairly rarely seen) socket that accepts mostly the CEE 7/17 plug (and the europlug), being like a type E socket but with what would be the earth pin as plastic, and with a strip from that pin to the edge.


See also:


Type E

Type E plug
Type E socket

Seen mostly in France, Belgium, also Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Denmark

Looks much like Type C, except for the male ground pin that sticks out.


While it has a fixed orientation, there is no polarization standard.


Not compatible with the fairly usual grounded Type C plugs, though there are plugs that will fit C/E/F sockets, such as #CEE 7/7 plugs, and the unearthed 7/17 plug and 7/16 plugs (see above).


Type I

(australia, some other places)


BS 1363 (UK)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BS_1363

Specialist

Audio

XLR

XLR3, XLR4, XLR6
This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)


Exists in a number of variations

  • XLR3 - the most common variant, used as a balanced audio connector, for speakers, equipment interconnections and microphones. (Previously also used to carry power to the same devices, but this is not done anymore to avoid confusion and mistakes)
  • XLR4
  • XLR5
  • XLR6

...and various others, some of which are considered obsolete.


There are some sockets that take both XLR and TRS (6.35mm, 1/4 inch TRS).


XLD is a (not often seen(verify)) variant of XLR that makes it hard to let you plug things in in (potentially) stupid ways.



See also: