Difference between revisions of "DIY, craft, materials, and such / Painting"

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{{DIY and crafts}}
 
{{DIY and crafts}}
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==On the ''why'' behind some habits painting wood and walls==
 
==On the ''why'' behind some habits painting wood and walls==
 
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In your typical household painting:
 
In your typical household painting:
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Historically, paint was more about protecting wood from rot,
 
Historically, paint was more about protecting wood from rot,
and still is on the outside of any house. In this case, the specific paint matters to longevity.
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and still is on the outside of any house.
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In this case, the specific paint matters to longevity.
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Inside, though, you can more or less do whatever you want.  
 
Inside, though, you can more or less do whatever you want.  
 
Most people like latex on their walls,  
 
Most people like latex on their walls,  
an in part because anything but the most matte acrylic will make for a shiny wall,
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in part because other paints tend to be shiny,
which is just unusual.
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in part because it's cheaper,
And in part because it's cheaper.
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in part because it's easier to work with,
And easier to work with.
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in part because many are less aggressive chemically.
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'''On primer'''
 
'''On primer'''
  
Paint is a mix of different functional parts
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Top-layer paints are both a base that helps things stick, and a finish that looks good.
a base that helps things stick,
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and a finish that looks good.
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Primer is paint without that finish.
  
Primer is paint without the good looks. Because this is cheaper than a nice finishing paint, this makes sense to use
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This is cheaper than a nice finishing paint, this makes sense to use
 
* as a first layer on something porous, such as plaster
 
* as a first layer on something porous, such as plaster
 
: primer itself will be absorbed
 
: primer itself will be absorbed
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:: (in part by just being there, in part by what it contains)
 
:: (in part by just being there, in part by what it contains)
  
* when one layer probably won't cover stains you want to hide stains.
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* when one layer probably won't cover stains you want to hide
 
: just because it's an extra layer  
 
: just because it's an extra layer  
: you can get colored primers if you want, but that's often unnecessary bother
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: you can get colored primers - can be worth it if painting significantly different color and you can avoid one extra layer of real paint.
  
* when there is variation in what the basis ''is'', e.g. raw wood with resiny parts  
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* when there is variation in what the base material ''is'', e.g. raw wood with resiny parts
  
 
* when you want to cover it with a finish a day or two after
 
* when you want to cover it with a finish a day or two after
  
  
On the last point:
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On the last point: Glossy acrylic is made to have things slide off, so you will need to do some light sanding to paint another layer on it.
: primer has a rough surface, meaning you can paint it immediately
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: whereas glossy acrylic is made to have things slide off
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Primer is usually a rough surface so you can add a layer on it directly. (...assuming you painted it recently enough that it's not dirty - when in doubt, lightly sanding primer can never hurt)
:: meaning it is recommended you lightly sand it for a rough surface, for the next layer to stick to
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:: after degreasing it, so that you don't actually spread said the grease around
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: yet for latex on walls, the difference may be small enough that two layers is basically the same
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For latex on walls, the difference may be small enough that two layers is basically the same
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==On rollers==
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Rollers really help speed, but there are various footnotes to it:
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Rollers make it a little harder to create a uniform coat - a little more so before you're aware of that.
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Large rollers make it harder to do edges near walls, so you might do that with brushes and then - but this ''might'' be a visibly different surface. Small rollers are preferable there.
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Rounded edges are largely to avoid thicker paint at the roller edges.
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Rounded at one edge can be handy to get coverage into a corner, though.
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For oil-based paints, prefer natural fiber.
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You may want to de-lint it first to avoid hairs transferring to the paint.
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(pro painters prefer reusing rollers because it's implicitly delinted)
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Felt/mohair roller
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: relatively dense
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: water & subtler turpentine based
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Nylon roller -
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: better for somewhat more aggressive paints, e.g. 2-component PU, epoxy, thinner based
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: short haired
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Foam roller
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: more uniform
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: less absorbing
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: ''not'' suited for some more aggresive paints
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Microfiber
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: give smoother finishes
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: but transfers less paint, so often require more layers
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: you might still like it for the last coat
  
 
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Latest revision as of 16:54, 13 July 2019

On the why behind some habits painting wood and walls

On rollers