Difference between revisions of "Out the airlock"

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You won't pass out until you run out of oxygen (or faints preventatively, which is a mechanism that should not apply here).
 
You won't pass out until you run out of oxygen (or faints preventatively, which is a mechanism that should not apply here).
  
You would have easily a dozen seconds worth of oxygen in your bloodstream. And maybe a little more in your lungs - with footnotes.  
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You would have easily a dozen seconds worth of oxygen in your bloodstream, your muscles have a little in ATP. You may have a little usable air in your lungs too - with footnotes.  
  
So even if you don't seen it coming, like a door accidentally opening and you have just exhaled deeper than usual, you still have a chance to close it, or possibly to flee to somewhere with oxygen, before you pass out.
 
  
 
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So even if you don't seen it coming, like a door accidentally opening and you have just exhaled deeper than usual, you still have a decent chance to close it, or possibly to flee to somewhere with oxygen, before you pass out.
After that things become less certain.
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Relaxing means less oxygen use by muscles.
 
Relaxing means less oxygen use by muscles.
Remember that even average people can hold their breath for a minute or two - when doing nothing.
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Remember that even average people can hold their breath for a minute or two - when not moving.
Exceptions and trained people a few multiples of ''that'' - freedivers do pretty amazing things.
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Most of your body is fine for a few minutes, but you should assume brain and eyes will become less useful sooner as your blood oxygen gets low.  
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Trained people can do a few multiples of ''that'', when doing a little work - freedivers do pretty amazing things, all things considered.
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Most of your body will function for up to a few, but you should assume brain and eyes will become less useful sooner, as your blood oxygen starts to lower. It becomes harder to think, and harder to coordinate movement.
 
It'll help to choose your use of muscles well.
 
It'll help to choose your use of muscles well.
  
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Gasping in the maximum amount of air is actually a ''bad'' idea, because gas laws says there will be expansion, which can be enough to rupture your lungs and possibly more.
 
Gasping in the maximum amount of air is actually a ''bad'' idea, because gas laws says there will be expansion, which can be enough to rupture your lungs and possibly more.
 
So maybe half a lung{{verify}}, or actively allowing a bunch to be knocked out of you, is much better.
 
So maybe half a lung{{verify}}, or actively allowing a bunch to be knocked out of you, is much better.
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Still, it won't help that much.
  
  
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Also, even when you have oxygen, your bloodstream will have more trouble pumping blood due to volume and pressure (partly discussed below), so you won't be your strongest or happiest self, but you will function.
Aside just oxygen presence, your bloodstream will have more trouble pumping blood due to volume and pressure,
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so you won't be your strongest or happiest self, but you will function.
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because it implies a lower-oxygen-using mode, and reflexive breathing.
 
because it implies a lower-oxygen-using mode, and reflexive breathing.
  
In space it's terribly, because there's no no oxygen, and may well lose useful air,
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In space it's terrible, because there's no no oxygen, you'll probably lose useful air,
 
and you probably won't regain consciousness by yourself.
 
and you probably won't regain consciousness by yourself.
  
  
There are some extra footnotes when coming from a pure-oxygen evironment, or from a lower pressure.
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There are some extra footnotes when coming from a pure-oxygen environment, or from a lower pressure.
 
And these are relevant because both are fairly usual for space suits.
 
And these are relevant because both are fairly usual for space suits.
 
But even so, there's not a large difference.
 
But even so, there's not a large difference.
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===Nitrogen===
 
===Nitrogen===
 
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Revision as of 23:31, 2 June 2021

This article/section is a stub — probably a pile of half-sorted notes, is not well-checked so may have incorrect bits. (Feel free to ignore, fix, or tell me)

Oxygen

Nitrogen

Gases and ebullism

Bloodflow

Skin

Freezing

Immediate damage

So what's the verdict?

What happens on the longer term?